Breakfast on the misty river

  • Oil on Canvas
  • 36″ x 48″
  • $6900
  • Giclée Prints
    12″ x 16″ image size – $395
    24” x 32” image size – $495

As the river meanders towards the horizon the warm light of the sunrise colors the mist. Clouds echo the river’s trail, partially covering a low lit moon. Bountiful food, savory and sweet, and coffee make for a morning
feast. Soft breezes blow, lifting the table’s skirt revealing butterfly milkweed, a prairie plant.

It is said to never under-estimate the importance of encountering wild things during moments of solitude. The artist forsakes solitude for companionship and offers up lots of wild things:
A butterfly glides toward the table, one clings to the billowing cloth while another sits astride a macaroon.
Caterpillars crawl on cloth and a milkweed plant, where a chrysalis hangs.
A buck and doe stand alert.
Great Blue Herons fly through vaporous ribbons of mist.
Ducks are startled and erupt in flight from the river’s edge.
Turkeys swim and scurry up the bank.
An eagle soars.
A ladybug sits.
A crystal rests on the table.
Hummingbirds flutter and feed around the zinnia and turkey feather bouquet.
Planets, the Milky Way, comets, galaxies and the morning star hint at the bigger, cosmic picture.

Champs

  • Oil on Canvas
  • 10″ x 20″
  • In a private collection

My sister-in-law, the baker, arrived carrying her tools, arranged carefully in tackle-like boxes. The raw materials to make lemon and chocolate confections for my daughter’s wedding had been delivered. From sacks of flour, sugar, cartons of eggs, chocolate and lemons she created mouthwatering cakes with little moons, the wedding’s motif, on top of mountains of icing. Delicious! Reflected in the silver bowl is a photo of the bride, groom and their prized baker.

The baker’s husband, my brother, is a bar-be-quer. He invited me to be his garnish-er for the American Royal competition in Kansas City, allowing me to witness a fun event and taste some great food. The painting shows a truck pulling a giant smoker in which every kind of meat, veggie and fruit was prepared to perfection.

This baker and the bar-be-quer are blue ribbon champs.

On Target

  • Oil on Ampersand 2″ Cradle Board
  • 48″ x 24″, diptych
  • In a private collection
  • 24″ x 12″ (image size) digital prints available for purchase – $395

Whenever I drive through Hannibal, Missouri, I like to take the time to savor some part of the place. If I’m lucky, it is time with a friend, but there are many pleasures including spectacular views of the Mississippi River and it’s eastern valley. On one occasion I was at the lighthouse when I noticed a sign inviting me into a neighboring artist’s studio. The woman was a weaver and with every shuttle thrust to weave the weft, she spoke the intention that the patron had requested. Many created works are full of intention. “On Target” was created as a representation of gratitude for life’s blessings and a visual representation of future goals. There’s power in visualizing our intentions and I appreciate the opportunity to create paintings around them.

Scarlet Tanagers, Walnuts and Pears

20″ x 16″
$1920
Oil on Linen
Contact the artist.

A tug pushes a barge on the river with sunlit clouds reflected in the water. Two young girls wave to the bargeman. The male Scarlet Tanager balances precariously on a pear, piercing it flesh. The female stands on the silver bowl camouflaged against the sky. A gentle breeze lifts the tablecloth’s skirt except where it’s held by the cook’s towel. Other bird paintings I’ve done that are similar to this, i.e. Chickadees and Coffee, Nuthatches and Walnuts, Beneath the Surface,  tend to have an ‘other world’ feel because there is no human presence, only an indication of it. Add two waving young girls and the place in the painting becomes more comfortable.

Nuthatches and Walnuts

January 25, 2010

Nuthatches and Walnuts

  • Oil on Masonite
  • 36″ x 12″
  • In a private collection

The painting began as an exercise in trompe l’oeil, deceiving the eye. An early American painter, Raphaelle Peale, came from a family of gifted realistic painters. I’ve always enjoyed one of his paintings,  “Venus Rising from the Sea, a Deception” at the Nelson Museum of Art in Kansas City. Peale’s painting draws on an ancient Roman story of two Greek painters in competition to see who was the better. Zeuxis painted grapes that attracted birds to his canvas. He turned to Parrhasios and asked him to remove the cloth from his painting. The painting of the drapery was so realistic, it had fooled Zeuxis.

The nuthatches are playful. The top one has knocked a walnut off the table and leans over to watch, hanging onto one of the pears. The low light casts long shadows and illuminates the clouds.

Food, Fabric and Romance

November 11, 2009

Food and Fabric
“Reflection”  Romance Series

  • Oil on Canvas
  • 48″ x 48″
  • In a private collection

Intimacy, companionship and romance are conveyed using fabric and food. This was an early painting in the romance series. Looking at this painting is like looking at a favorite quilt. All the fabrics hold memories for me. Corn and croissant were often used in my still lifes from this period. Oranges remain a favorite, as does coffee.

Sunday Morning

October 20, 2009

Sunday Morning
“Sunday Morning”

“Sunday Morning” as it should be; lazy, loads of treats and lots of possibilities.

Winds of Time

June 1, 2009

WindOfTime
Winds of Time

This painting is about memories of a life lived with tragedy, love, loss, joy, art, birth, death, friendship; all events that happen during our lifetimes.  And then there’s NOW.  Once, I met a man who wore a watch that didn’t give a time, it only said “NOW.” The photos represent events of the past, while the still life images brings you back to the present.

And then there’s you viewing this image right NOW. It’s worth examining how we experience the moment consciously and unconsciously.

Delicious Intimacy

April 27, 2009

redwinechoc
Red Wine and Chocolates

The  still life for Red Wine and Chocolates includes a rug and fabrics that are part of my history.  The bird’s eye view with roses, red wine and chocolate allows the space to appear intimate and romantic.