Lessons learned and art created at Homestead National Monument of America

The Homestead National Monument of America, established in 1936, presents the homesteading story of the United States. In 1862 Abraham Lincoln signed the Homestead Act, including land Native Americans occupied and given to them through treaties. They were forced from those lands and onto reservations as immigrants flooded in to homestead. Encouraged by the expansionist fervor promoted by the railroads and other business interests, millions were anxious to escape a feudal or other dehumanizing system and have a chance to obtain “free land”, civil freedom, the perception of unlimited resources, independence and a chance for free education. The National Monument strives to tell the story from all sides. Quoting from the Homestead site brochure:

Butterfly Milkweed with Monarch
Milkweed and Monarch 36″ x 12″ Mixed Media, In the Collection of MR

Cottonwood tree at Homestead
Cottonwood at Homestead 25″ x 22″ Pastel on Charcoal Paper $200

Giant Cottonwood with Wild Plums
Approx 25″ x 22″
Pastel on Charcoal Paper
$200




Speed Queen Wringer Washer
Approx 12″ x 8″
Pastel on Charcoal Paper
In the collection of B Lehenbauer




Tallgrass Prairie with Hedge Row
Oil on Paper
Approx 17″ x 21″
In the collection of N/J Harper




Mowed path along Hedge Row at Homestead National Monument of America
Oil on Paper
Approx. 17″ x 21″
In the collection of C Mills





Storm at Homestead National Monument of America
Oil on Paper
Approx 17″ x 21″
In the collection of J/A Baker

3 thoughts on “Lessons learned and art created at Homestead National Monument of America

  1. Stunning work! As someone who could stare for hours at a cottonwood trunk, transported by the intricate patterns and deep grooves and the ancient wisdom that seems to emanate from it, I love those pieces. And the renditions of the bright green prairie in spring are incredibly alluring. I want to walk that mowed path and see the vista from the hill. And oh the sky in the storm painting! I can almost smell the ozone in the air.

    A retreat well-spent. Congratulations on this marvelous work, Nancy.

  2. How lucky you are to have spent two weeks at Homestead. And to find your great-grandparents in the census must have been icing on the cake. Beautiful work, peaceful.

  3. Your exceptional ability to express thoughts and feelings through eloquently rendered images has proven once again that a picture is worth an infinite number of words. You’ve captured the beauty, magic, allure, respite—life force and invaluable offerings—of mother Earth. Thank you for using your skills of artistic and written expression to touch others’ hearts with your perceptions of the bounty of this planet and to remind us we can be an integral part of a thriving, dynamic web of life or we can be a destructive element. To a large extent, the choice really is ours. You’ve added immeasurably to the understanding of what’s at stake in this choice.

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