What’s Time to a Pig?

December 5, 2016

whats-time-to-a-pig-web-501x600

  • 12′ X 9” approximately
  • Mixed media including watercolor and colored pencil

A small drawing with meaning for the pictured couple. They raise livestock on their farm and this story is a family favorite.

A farmer stood up in an apple tree holding her pig. A man, passing by, asked what she was doing. “Feeding my pig” she replied holding the pig up so the pig could snag another apple off the branch. The man said, “Doesn’t it take a long time to feed a pig that way? The farmer’s response, “What’s time to a pig?”

On Target

  • Oil on Ampersand 2″ Cradle Board
  • 48″ x 24″, diptych
  • In a private collection
  • 24″ x 12″ (image size) digital prints available for purchase – $395

Whenever I drive through Hannibal, Missouri, I like to take the time to savor some part of the place. If I’m lucky, it is time with a friend, but there are many pleasures including spectacular views of the Mississippi River and it’s eastern valley. On one occasion I was at the lighthouse when I noticed a sign inviting me into a neighboring artist’s studio. The woman was a weaver and with every shuttle thrust to weave the weft, she spoke the intention that the patron had requested. Many created works are full of intention. “On Target” was created as a representation of gratitude for life’s blessings and a visual representation of future goals. There’s power in visualizing our intentions and I appreciate the opportunity to create paintings around them.

Hedge Apple on Scratchboard

February 13, 2010

Hedge Apple

  • Scratchboard and Ink
  • 7″ x 5″
  • $350

Last fall Hedge Apples littered the forest path where I was walking. In the past I’ve gathered them to store in the corner of a shed to discourage mice. It didn’t work. Now I gather them to study their pattern. And just as Dr. Seuss’ Horton heard a “Who”, I expect to hear them too. The hedge ball or apple becomes a world unto itself floating in space.

Sunday Morning

October 20, 2009

Sunday Morning
“Sunday Morning”

“Sunday Morning” as it should be; lazy, loads of treats and lots of possibilities.

Three Apples

July 22, 2009

Three Apples

Three Apples

  • 9″ x 12″
  • Oil on Canvas
  • In the collection of BR

Three Apples is a simple composition, loosely painted or as some might say, a painterly style.

Robert Henri is one of my favorite “painterly” painters. He grew up in the frontier Nebraska town founded by his father, John J. Cozad in 1871, then named Cozaddale, now just Cozad. It stands on the 100th meridian, which was the end of the line at the time for the railroad.  There you’ll find a Robert Henri Museum. How his name changed from Cozad to Henri is a tale harrowing to live through, but good for the telling.

Three Apples was gifted to a doctor who, perhaps, saved my sister’s life because he knew how to read a lab report. At least he saved her from suffering at the hands of the incompetent.

Remembering Family

June 19, 2009

MikeWell
Remembering Family

  • Oil on Canvas
  • 24″ x 36″
  • In the collection of M/CW
  • Digital Prints available, 12″ x 18″ image size, $395, Contact the artist.

Remembering Family was commissioned as a gift. The client liked the Winds of Time with pictures floating through the painting. The memories include two old friends (Dad and Uncle) remembered. When they were together, they enjoyed Chianti wine with cheese and apples. There are parents, young and old, a young child, a championship dog, a westie, echinacea, the city park that the family had established and the family farm.

Corn Painting

June 9, 2009

Autumn Harvest

Autumn Harvest

  • Oil on Canvas
  • 24″ x 30″
  • In the collection of KH

stilllifeonkansasriversmall1

Still Life on the Kansas River

  • Oil on Canvas
  • 24″ x 36″
  • $4975
  • Limited edition of 500, archival paper, 12″ x 18″ digital prints – $395,  plus shipping
  • Contact the artist.

The Kansas River is rising tonight. Our son, Nat, is the boatman for the University. He spent the afternoon at the boathouse preparing for high water. Growing up on the Mississippi River, I’ve seen floodwater bend the spine of a storage silo once standing at perfect attention. Every ten years or so that mighty river would break through the Corp’s levy system and reclaim some of the territory it once seasonally replenished with new soil. I’ve always appreciated the power and loved the beauty of the rivers.

Still Life on the Kansas River is a view of downtown and north Lawrence, Kansas, from Burcham Park. Lightning bugs, butterfly and a snail share space with a universal night sky, a sunset, moonflowers and sunflowers. Human companionship and simple pleasures are saluted. But there is an edginess to the painting because it’s hard to tell exactly where the water ends and the fabric begins in the still life.